A major appeal of the First Born® Program (FBP) is its promise of effectiveness and its ability to enhance the lives of children and their families who receive program services. First Born will continue to have these effects only if it is implemented according to the original program design.  Staying true to the original program design is what assures program fidelity.

It is expected that each community will put its own “spin” on First Born — some adaptation to accommodate differences in each community is to be expected. While adaptations may be justified, changes to the content, duration, frequency, and delivery style of the program may diminish First Born’s effects.

Communities that implement the FBP with fidelity can expect the following outcomes:

An increase in the number of resilient pregnant women who:

  • Do not use alcohol, tobacco or other harmful drugs during pregnancy;
  • Receive consistent prenatal care;
  • Participate in childbirth classes; and
  • Deliver healthy, full-term babies.

An increase in the number of resilient infants who:

  • Are born full-term and healthy;
  • Do not experience Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), including abuse and neglect;
  • Are exclusively breastfed for six months;
  • Are immunized and receiving well baby checks with a medical provider;
  • Ride in safe car seats;
  • Live in a safe and nurturing environment that promotes school readiness and a lifelong joy of learning;       
  • Are achieving normal infant growth and development or are referred for assessment; and
  • Are bonded with and have positive relationships with their parents and caregivers.

An increase in the number of resilient parents who:

  • Are bonding with their infant and have positive interactions with their infant;
  • Are creating a safe and nurturing environment for their infant that is free of domestic violence;
  • Are increasing their knowledge, skills and insights into the parenting process;
  • Are experiencing pleasure in parenting;
  • Are screened for Post Partum Depression and referred accordingly;
  • Are continuing their education;
  • Space their second births; and
  • Know what formal and informal community resources are available and how to access those services.

A resilient community that:

  • Is active in the community health improvement process;
  • Participates in collaborative efforts; and
  • Forms broad-based community coalitions and alliances that support collaboration.